Spent about SEVEN HOURS today visiting with Uncle Randy and Aunt Mary Ellen at the lake! I got there at 3:40 and didn’t leave until 10:30. I told them several times they should kick me out (in case they were getting tired), but nope! (I got the sense that Aunt Mary Ellen was starting to get a little tired near the end, but that Uncle Randy didn’t want me to leave and kept talking and talking!) The coolest part is, I had never even exchanged more than just a few words back and forth with them until just a few years ago. I was always sort of scared of them when I was younger! But they are actually insanely easy to talk to and incredibly enjoyable to spend time with. And I’m not usually good at talking to people and get easily worn out by too much socializing. But I was chatting away the entire time!

I think the reason they are so good to talk to is: 1) they make you feel really comfortable and at home, 2) they actually talk about interesting stuff, 3) they let me talk, too, so it feels very balanced and engaging.

Because I’m quiet and reserved, sometimes when people talk to me, they don’t really let me say anything. Like I say one thing about myself or what I’m interested in, and then because I’m not that forward about it, they proceed to take over the conversation and just talk about themselves nonstop so I only react/comment on their topics and never really get to share anything myself. I’d like to (in some cases), but I need the right feedback to open up. Uncle Randy and Aunt Mary Ellen don’t do that. They talk about all sorts of different topics, and actually let me contribute to the conversation. And because they make me feel so comfortable, I’m much more animated with them, and more casual/relaxed. I like it!

My family left this morning to drive back to Maryland, and I was so tired this evening that I actually fell asleep on the couch before dark and slept for hours! I woke up just now at 9:30-ish to the sound of the photos I posted on Facebook this afternoon receiving lots of comments and tag requests, and I think I’m still too numb-and-tingly-brained to even look at them.

[Edit: It seemed way too quiet today with my visitors gone! I miss Diane, David, Marilou and Hunter already! Too bad they TRASHED my house.

…Just kidding—they were excellent guests and I loved having them here.]

Giant four-hour chat with my sister after everyone else has gone to bed = SO NICE. Late night conversations with family are the BEST! My family’s visit has been great so far. They arrived well before the storm, and David, Hunter and I even got to play a little badminton in the yard. Our corn on the cob and steamers feast was a great success and it’s so fun and relaxing having everyone here! I feel very laid-back and un-stressed about it, yay!

We had a lot of lightning and thunder tonight after David’s family went to bed, and it went on for quite a while, but it didn’t seem that bad… there weren’t high winds or anything. We’ll see what tomorrow’s weather brings. If we’re stuck inside we can always play nonstop Apples to Apples. :-)

Yaaay! My family is almost here! I am so happy that they are coming up from Maryland to visit for the 4th of July!!!

Uncle Randy telephoned earlier to say that the celebration at the Lake is being slid out to the 5th based on tomorrow’s weather forecast. Good call!

Today is still sunny so far, but severe storms are supposed to be on the way.

I think I’m all ready to get visited.

I am being really really ANTI-LINEAR today. I keep doing highly productive stuff, but jumping from one thing to the next and completely forgetting about the other things in between, then going back to them when I discover them half-finished. Heh.

I’ve been trying to wake up EARLIER for PRACTICE, because David’s family and Diane are going to visit for 4th of July weekend, so I made a date to pick cherries at Belltown with Susie this morning so I’d be forced to get up by ten. I’ve never picked cherries before (Susie suggested it), and it was fun and easy to pick lots! I hope they’ll still be good when my fam comes so they can help me eat them!!

After Susie left, I did a zillion random things, like setting up the guest room, weeding some weeds, washing lots of things, streamlining the guest room closet (which is my overflow closet, since the closet in my room needs space to access the secret door in the back) and making a bag of things to donate, then sewing some new skirts using fabric I had in my stash! I also worked on making food plans for the 4th of July, organizing my new gravestone photos, and finalizing the 1920s music CDs I’m making from my old cassettes + some bonus songs I got on iTunes. I’ve been listening to 1920s music while doing all that and NONSTOP for the past two weeks, BTW. I’ve completely forgotten modern music exists. ‘Twenties music is SO GOOD. Aaaaah!!

I was talking (well, writing) to my mom about cooking the frozen pig’s head my neighbor gave me, and told her, “I probably won’t actually try to make head cheese—that seems like too much work, and I’m pretty lazy! I’ll use a rainy day to simmer the heck out of the head and see what happens.”

She wrote back, “My guess is that all of the meat will come off. I don’t think you’re a lazy cook either! I think you’re an adventurous cook and that’s final!!!”

Ha! If my mom says it’s final, I guess it’s final! :-D

9 plays

Audio of my grandmother remembering her school days. See my previous post for the background story about this recording, made in 1979 when she was 74 years old.

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Several years ago, my parents gave me an old 60-minute cassette tape of my father interviewing my grandmother (his mother) when she was visiting our family for Christmas in 1979. My brother Robert and my mom also chime in with a few questions. (That’s Robert you can hear asking, “How long did you get off for Christmas vacation?”) She starts off with her earliest memories of Christmas, then talks about other childhood memories, how she met my grandfather, and the early years of their marriage. My grandmother was born in 1905, so it’s a glimpse into a very different world, and some of the things she talks about, such as traveling to school at the Woodstock Academy by horse, having the first telephone in town, and what they did on Sundays, are pretty darned cool.

My very favorite thing about the tape is just listening to the way she spoke, though. My grandmother’s family was descended from the first settlers of Woodstock, Connecticut, who came from Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1686 (and from England before that), and they spoke with an accent that reminds me a little bit of the Boston Brahmin accent. To my ears, it does sound like an accent, but a subtle one. I would be curious how extreme or normal it sounds to other people. I love hearing how she said certain things, like North Woodstock (“Nawth Woodstock”), horses (“hawses), Norwich (“Nor’idg”), and dark (“dahk”), and how precisely she spoke. I only remember her as an old lady who had recovered from a stroke, so she didn’t speak as beautifully when I knew her.

Having this recording is very very special. She died in 2002, and I don’t know if there is even anyone alive who speaks like this anymore. I’ve wanted very badly to be able to digitize the cassette, but I didn’t have a working tape player that I could hook up to my computer. Last week I found a very nice old Sony unit at a thrift store for only $7, so I bought it, and was able to make a digital copy of the whole tape tonight. The sound quality is better than I ever expected and I am so pleased. I can hardly believe it’s actually on my computer now. I’m going to burn it to CDs to share with my family, but here’s just a snippet so you can hear. I’ll share a second one in my next post.

Anyway, Milford. I just love Old Milford. I’m really glad I was “forced” to go back to find John Gaud’s stone. The lighting was different enough at 2:00 vs. Sunday’s 5:00 that I got much better pictures of some of the stones but was able to totally skip areas that were inferiorly lit. There are too many stones there to photograph them all, which is kind of great because it forces me to just sort of wander and notice cool details and photograph what catches my fancy.

There are so so so so sooooo many cool John Gaud stones. So many. I’m not usually into skull stones (vs. winged faces) but I adore John Gaud for some reason. I think it’s mostly because of the weird colorful chlorite schist he used, but, as a consequence, I pick up on all sorts of fantastic things about them.

I found some thin broken fragments of chlorite schist collected up under a tree (probably so the lawnmower wouldn’t hit them), so I purloined a few. They don’t have carving on them (except for a tiny bit of border on one piece), and it’s not like they can be put back together to repair the stone they came from. But they are really cool to look at, all orange and silver and gray and layered.

Random:

- I learned a cool new word: panegyric! Mr. Garrit V.H. DeWitt’s gravestone (by Thomas Gold) says his character “requires not the panegerick of a tombstone to perpuate it to posterity.” Thanks iPhone dictionary app, for allowing me to figure out what the heck “panegerick” was supposed to mean! (Mr. Mr. Garrit V.H. DeWitt was born in the Netherlands, btw.)

- I don’t know why, but Old Milford is pretty much the windiest cemetery EVER! I’m glad I came when it was warm. And I’m glad I didn’t bother washing my hair and it was still all messy and windblown from when I was there on Sunday.

- I love LOVE it when the trains go by, although it makes me a little wistful for New York.

On the way back, since it was still decently early, I stopped at Long Hill Burying Ground in Shelton. It was established in 1720 but there are only about fifteen 18th century stones (plus some foot stones) and most are slate skulls. Good, because the stones face east, so they were all in shadow, but I wasn’t too teased since there’s nothing outstandingly interesting. Lots of stones for the Shelton family, though, which is cool. I guess now I know how the town got its name!

My mom grew up in Ansonia, which is right near Shelton and Derby, and not too far from Milford, so this part of the state is interesting to me, even though it’s not nearby or very familiar. It’s a pretty area, along the banks of the Housatonic and Naugatuck Rivers. We used to visit my grandma in Ansonia when I was little, but she died when I was seven, so I barely remember it. But I just feel a feeling of “Nice!” when I’m there that I think comes from a subconscious recognition deep inside.

I avoided 91 by driving home via the Wilbur Cross Parkway and then sneaking across through Middlefield and Middletown and Portland, so the traffic wasn’t bad at all, even though it was rush hour. I was getting tired and really hungry by then, so I stopped in Middletown and had dinner at Forbidden City. I haven’t been there in ages. But EVERYTHING I ordered was SO DELICIOUS. I couldn’t have made better selections! It was relaxing and revitalizing and perfect. I got a Hong Kong Dumpling Soup (unbelievably good!), a Herb Crusted Rack of Lamb (it was served on gorgeous green sautéed edamame and fava beans!), both of which are appetizers, so they weren’t too big, but were just right. And I afterwards I ordered a cappuccino and it actually had good foam! And I didn’t even specially request nice foam. Nice.

Today was SO GOOD.  Now all I need is rain pattering against the windows while I watch Hannibal to finish it off.

1) Got up early, but not painfully early (10 AM), and drove to Bozrah.  Beautiful Bozrah. Johnson Burying Ground.  It was perfect there.  So calming, peaceful, delightful.  I realized why New Haven’s no good:  all the old stones are in an unbroken row, so you don’t wander.  Your brain doesn’t unwind.  It isn’t fun. Bozrah is very fun.  I’d been there once before, but the stones face both ways, so lots of them were in shadow.  I thought I photographed the afternoon stones, but no—actually I photographed the morning stones!  Because, for some unexplained reason, afternoon comes very, very late in Bozrah.  So when I arrived I re-photographed the same ones I saw last time, without realizing it until later.  But that doesn’t matter, because this time I took a lot more photos, and I also discovered that Bozrah is a Wedding Cake Stone smorgasbord!!  There’s a CAKE-and-willow stone.  There’s a MINI wedding cake stone.  (A wedding cupcake?)  There’s a DOUBLE-MINI wedding cake stone!  Suddenly my tiny wedding cake stone collection is a turning into an elaborate buffet!

2) After I was finished photographing all the unshaded stones at Johnson Burying Ground, I drove to the Bozrah French Country Market, which was about FIVE minutes away.  It’s a one-time-only thing today, put on by the Bozrah Farmers’ Market people, and was sort of a combination flea market and farmers’ market (minus the fresh fruit and vegetables, since they aren’t in season yet).  It was fairly small, but a nice size, and really cute, and had good stuff!  I had no idea that Bozrah even had a farmers’ market, but apparently it’s a really good one and was voted the #1 Farmers’ Market in Connecticut and #9 in the country last year in the American Farmland Trust “I Love My Farmers’ Market” contest!!  (!!!!!?)  Yep, it beat the Coventry Farmers’ Market!  And it’s on Friday afternoons, and Bozrah is secretly only half an hour away. Why have I never heard of it??  Anyway, I told my in-laws about the French Country Market event a few days ago, and they wanted to go, so we met up there!  That was pretty neat.  My mother-in-law and I both got truffles from my favorite truffle maker, and Beltane cheese, and I got an eat-it-now food.  I’m horrible at getting eat-it-now foods at markets!  But I did it, and it was good.

3) Went to…. Johnson Burying Ground, again, at about 1:10! Sitting on a fieldstone wall overlooking a little swift-flowing river, munching on a crisp apple while waiting for the sun to move across the bright blue sky and light the other side of a sweet and quirky collection of 18th century gravestones is pretty much the best way to kill time ever. In my opinion.  And my Bozrah Devil Carver stone collection has now expanded!

4) Drove to Parkman Burying Ground, which is also about 5 minutes from the site of the Bozrah Farmers’ Market, but in the other direction!  However, the snaily sun was still on the wrong side of the stones at Parkman, even though it was 2:30 by then.  (Bozrah is a really weird town.)  I gave up and left, since I figured I could always visit in the late afternoon sometime if I go to the Bozrah Farmers’ Market!  Anyway, it’s pretty small and doesn’t have much (although there’s supposed to be one Bozrah Devil Carver stone).

5) Drove to Raymond Hill Burying Ground in Montville, which was also a delightfully non-far distance, and was easy to find because my Past Self had saved the location to my GPS when I went there last time but couldn’t get the sun to move across the sky far enough (at 1:30).  This time arrived at 3:00 and the lighting was grand!  Last time I visited, I wrote, “I was consoled by the fact that there weren’t that many cool-looking stones (as far as I could tell, with the deep shadows on their faces), so it wasn’t as huge a tease as it might have been otherwise.” Soooooo wrong, Past Self!  Raymond Hill is fantastic!  It looks a little boring when you’re standing at the gate, but it’s secretly PETER BARKER HEAVEN!!! My brain melted down, confronted with so many Peter Barker stones all in one place!  There are eighteen of them (I’ll have to count and see if I got them all), and some of them are even readable.

6) While I was snailishly sitting on the ground transcribing this grandly readable Peter Barker stone, Susie commented on Facebook, “You should stop at Scotties on the way home.”  It turned out that she was on her way to Scotties with Alex, and was about 20 minutes away.  I looked up Scotties on my phone and discovered that I was also about 20 minutes away.  So, I finished taking the rest of my photos speedily, and then met up with them and got a frozen custard and Hosmer Mountain birch beer soda!  Even though we only live a few towns apart, I haven’t seen Susie in a couple of years.  It was really nice, and we got to chat a bunch, and as we were leaving, I said, “Hey, want a CD?” and of course she did because she loves music, so I gave her my test-burn of my spring mix that I’d been listening to in my car CD player!

7) On the way back from Colchester, I stopped at Paul & Sandy’s garden center and bought some herbs for the herb bed!  Lemon thyme, English thyme, creeping rosemary, friendly sage, and French tarragon.  The two thymes are both giant and I bet Dean will love them since he thinks it’s always time for thyme.  When I was paying for the herbs, a person from Pilates said hi to me, and at first I started to say my usual apologetic, “I’m sorry, I’m really horrible with faces…” explanation as to why I didn’t recognize her, but then I realized I DID recognize her, and I blurted out delightedly, “Oh, you’re the new person!!”  She said, “Yes, I’m the new TALL girl!”  It’s true, the reason I actually recognized her was that she’s super tall (and I remembered her blonde hair, also).

So I actually socialized with FOUR people today (sort of).  Is that some kind of record?

Oh yeah, the shoes picture is from Johnson Burying Ground.  I tired wearing my Bean shoes for gravehounding today, because my shoes always get really dirty and I feel bad for them.  It was great, and I think Bean shoes should be my new official gravehounding shoes!  They’re not just good for the yard.  They’re good for GRAVE yards, too.

Last night I said to himself, “I’ve got to stop going to so many cemeteries.  I feel addicted."  I was exhausted and I couldn’t stop.  But today was rejuvenating.  The choice of burying grounds makes a big difference.  And not overdoing it analyzing things to death for 1,000 hours on the computer afterwards when I’m already worn out from driving around all day and getting up early.  I’ve got to learn to pace myself.

Okay, Hannibal time.  I already ate my liver.

Today was SO GOOD. Now all I need is rain pattering against the windows while I watch Hannibal to finish it off.

1) Got up early, but not painfully early (10 AM), and drove to Bozrah. Beautiful Bozrah. Johnson Burying Ground. It was perfect there. So calming, peaceful, delightful. I realized why New Haven’s no good: all the old stones are in an unbroken row, so you don’t wander. Your brain doesn’t unwind. It isn’t fun. Bozrah is very fun. I’d been there once before, but the stones face both ways, so lots of them were in shadow. I thought I photographed the afternoon stones, but no—actually I photographed the morning stones! Because, for some unexplained reason, afternoon comes very, very late in Bozrah. So when I arrived I re-photographed the same ones I saw last time, without realizing it until later. But that doesn’t matter, because this time I took a lot more photos, and I also discovered that Bozrah is a Wedding Cake Stone smorgasbord!! There’s a CAKE-and-willow stone. There’s a MINI wedding cake stone. (A wedding cupcake?) There’s a DOUBLE-MINI wedding cake stone! Suddenly my tiny wedding cake stone collection is a turning into an elaborate buffet!

2) After I was finished photographing all the unshaded stones at Johnson Burying Ground, I drove to the Bozrah French Country Market, which was about FIVE minutes away. It’s a one-time-only thing today, put on by the Bozrah Farmers’ Market people, and was sort of a combination flea market and farmers’ market (minus the fresh fruit and vegetables, since they aren’t in season yet). It was fairly small, but a nice size, and really cute, and had good stuff! I had no idea that Bozrah even had a farmers’ market, but apparently it’s a really good one and was voted the #1 Farmers’ Market in Connecticut and #9 in the country last year in the American Farmland Trust “I Love My Farmers’ Market” contest!! (!!!!!?) Yep, it beat the Coventry Farmers’ Market! And it’s on Friday afternoons, and Bozrah is secretly only half an hour away. Why have I never heard of it?? Anyway, I told my in-laws about the French Country Market event a few days ago, and they wanted to go, so we met up there! That was pretty neat. My mother-in-law and I both got truffles from my favorite truffle maker, and Beltane cheese, and I got an eat-it-now food. I’m horrible at getting eat-it-now foods at markets! But I did it, and it was good.

3) Went to…. Johnson Burying Ground, again, at about 1:10! Sitting on a fieldstone wall overlooking a little swift-flowing river, munching on a crisp apple while waiting for the sun to move across the bright blue sky and light the other side of a sweet and quirky collection of 18th century gravestones is pretty much the best way to kill time ever. In my opinion. And my Bozrah Devil Carver stone collection has now expanded!

4) Drove to Parkman Burying Ground, which is also about 5 minutes from the site of the Bozrah Farmers’ Market, but in the other direction! However, the snaily sun was still on the wrong side of the stones at Parkman, even though it was 2:30 by then. (Bozrah is a really weird town.) I gave up and left, since I figured I could always visit in the late afternoon sometime if I go to the Bozrah Farmers’ Market! Anyway, it’s pretty small and doesn’t have much (although there’s supposed to be one Bozrah Devil Carver stone).

5) Drove to Raymond Hill Burying Ground in Montville, which was also a delightfully non-far distance, and was easy to find because my Past Self had saved the location to my GPS when I went there last time but couldn’t get the sun to move across the sky far enough (at 1:30). This time arrived at 3:00 and the lighting was grand! Last time I visited, I wrote, “I was consoled by the fact that there weren’t that many cool-looking stones (as far as I could tell, with the deep shadows on their faces), so it wasn’t as huge a tease as it might have been otherwise.” Soooooo wrong, Past Self! Raymond Hill is fantastic! It looks a little boring when you’re standing at the gate, but it’s secretly PETER BARKER HEAVEN!!! My brain melted down, confronted with so many Peter Barker stones all in one place! There are eighteen of them (I’ll have to count and see if I got them all), and some of them are even readable.

6) While I was snailishly sitting on the ground transcribing this grandly readable Peter Barker stone, Susie commented on Facebook, “You should stop at Scotties on the way home.” It turned out that she was on her way to Scotties with Alex, and was about 20 minutes away. I looked up Scotties on my phone and discovered that I was also about 20 minutes away. So, I finished taking the rest of my photos speedily, and then met up with them and got a frozen custard and Hosmer Mountain birch beer soda! Even though we only live a few towns apart, I haven’t seen Susie in a couple of years. It was really nice, and we got to chat a bunch, and as we were leaving, I said, “Hey, want a CD?” and of course she did because she loves music, so I gave her my test-burn of my spring mix that I’d been listening to in my car CD player!

7) On the way back from Colchester, I stopped at Paul & Sandy’s garden center and bought some herbs for the herb bed! Lemon thyme, English thyme, creeping rosemary, friendly sage, and French tarragon. The two thymes are both giant and I bet Dean will love them since he thinks it’s always time for thyme. When I was paying for the herbs, a person from Pilates said hi to me, and at first I started to say my usual apologetic, “I’m sorry, I’m really horrible with faces…” explanation as to why I didn’t recognize her, but then I realized I DID recognize her, and I blurted out delightedly, “Oh, you’re the new person!!” She said, “Yes, I’m the new TALL girl!” It’s true, the reason I actually recognized her was that she’s super tall (and I remembered her blonde hair, also).

So I actually socialized with FOUR people today (sort of). Is that some kind of record?

Oh yeah, the shoes picture is from Johnson Burying Ground. I tired wearing my Bean shoes for gravehounding today, because my shoes always get really dirty and I feel bad for them. It was great, and I think Bean shoes should be my new official gravehounding shoes! They’re not just good for the yard. They’re good for GRAVE yards, too.

Last night I said to himself, “I’ve got to stop going to so many cemeteries. I feel addicted." I was exhausted and I couldn’t stop. But today was rejuvenating. The choice of burying grounds makes a big difference. And not overdoing it analyzing things to death for 1,000 hours on the computer afterwards when I’m already worn out from driving around all day and getting up early. I’ve got to learn to pace myself.

Okay, Hannibal time. I already ate my liver.

I was too tired to write much about it last night, but yesterday morning’s visit to Old Upton Cemetery in Derby was awesome. It’s such a good cemetery! I think the morning stones (east-facing) were even better than the afternoon stones (west-facing) that I saw last Sunday, and that’s saying a lot! There are so many skulls, it’s unbelievable. And many of them are very small, uneven, dark skulls, obviously striving to copy the style of the classic Boston slates, but falling short charmingly and ending up much more interesting as a result. Although care was put into these stones, and the carver wasn’t unskilled, they look crude and homespun, and are on an odd dense-looking un-smooth dark blue-gray mottled stone, splotched with rusty-looking red and yellow. I think it must be a local stone because all the earliest markers are made from this same material. (I’ll have to write a separate post showing some of my favorites.) Contrastingly, there are also a lot of very nice slate stones imported from Boston, so it’s really fun to compare them.

One of the old, crude stones has a plaque in front of it that says it’s for, “Dr. John Durand. Born: La Rochelle, France, 1667. Died: Derby, Conn., March 29, 1727. A French Huguenot who came to America in 1685. He brought the first lilac bushes to this country.” The first lilacs! I thought that was really cool.

And there’s one Peter Barker stone, with a Peter Barker footstone. I’ve never seen a Peter Barker with an intact footstone! (I love Peter Barker, even though (or because?) his stones are really hard to read.) There are lots of footstones at Old Upton.

Right afterwards, I went to the very close by Elm Street Cemetery in Ansonia (it’s literally right down the road, a few minutes away), which is much smaller and nowhere near as good, but it has some interesting stones too, including two Peter Barkers, a bunch of slate stones (haven’t figured out the carver yet—Lamson, I think), and some stones made from a very strange material. It’s white and doesn’t wear well, so most are very hard to read. I guess it’s a kind of marble? They are stained gray but you can see that they are white underneath, and it sort of looks like it was eaten away by acid rain or something. It’s not like the typical 19th century marble white stones… it’s much more bumpy with big shiny crystals, like salt that you’d put in a grinder. Very crystal-y and textured looking. They are flared-ear style stones, and all by the same carver. There are stones like this in Derby, too, but the ones in Ansonia are in better condition.

I love going through the Heroes’ Tunnel (formerly West Rock Tunnel) on the Wilbur Cross Parkway. It reminds me of when I was a little girl. I guess we used to go through it when we visited Grandmother Dreher and then afterwards continued to Grandmother Whaples’ house or the Lake. I always used to close my eyes when we went through it, and sense when to open them again by the brightness on my eyelids. (I don’t do that while driving, obviously.)

[Edit: I think the crude skulls on the mottled stone are by John Gaud!!! There are ones in Milford like them, which is very close to Derby! Oh, this is an exciting discovery!]

I posted about my adventure today on my new gravestone blog! It was really fun, despite some giant teases. Going to Derby and Ansonia was totally unplanned… I intended to go to Wallingford, but since that failed, I tried North Haven, and when that failed I just said, “Well, I’m down this far anyway, and it’s a beautiful day… might as well try Derby!!” Good call, Self.

Driving around Ansonia and Derby was kind of crazy… it’s so hilly, with all sorts of weird little streets that meet up every which way at extreme angles. I called my parents (who were on vacation with my sister, so it was extra great!) for help finding the family gravestones in Ansonia and finding my mom’s old house. The house looks totally different from when my grandma lived there (I barely remember it, because I was 7 when she died, but even I knew it was nothing like how it was) because they put on all sorts of ugly additions and cut down all the trees and hedges and paved over half the yard. It was still fun/cool finding it, though, and I even talked to a neighbor across the street who knew my grandmother!!

gravestonegeek:

Today I went to FOUR old graveyards: Center Street Cemetery in Wallingford (failure, because the old stones face east, so they were all in shadow), Center Cemetery in North Haven (ditto), Old Derby Upton Burying Ground (success! well, partial success… the stones face both ways), and Elm Street…

I made Easter eggs! My favorite’s the hideous one. I wonder which one Dean will vote for? Also, my hand now looks exactly like when I used to make pressed cookies with my dad.

P.S. Note my Much Improved formerly-haunted scratch!

This is how I found out about the gravestone code.  It’s James Leeson’s gravestone, at Trinity Churchyard in lower Manhattan.  I went there with Thomas on the 4th of July and noticed the curious squares at the top of the stone, which I pointed out to him.  (They are actually pretty hard to see unless the lighting is perfect.  I took this photo another time, when I went back in September.)  Then I kind of forgot about it, because I often observe interesting details on gravestones, and there was a lot of other stuff going on that week.  Later Thomas must’ve researched the stone, and he told me how to decipher the code!  So I left that coded message for him at Chelsea Market.  But I don’t think he’s ever looked at it. :-( Maybe someone else will see it and figure it out.  

(Note that there is no letter J in the code, because originally I and J were the same letter.  Very cool.)

This is how I found out about the gravestone code. It’s James Leeson’s gravestone, at Trinity Churchyard in lower Manhattan. I went there with Thomas on the 4th of July and noticed the curious squares at the top of the stone, which I pointed out to him. (They are actually pretty hard to see unless the lighting is perfect. I took this photo another time, when I went back in September.) Then I kind of forgot about it, because I often observe interesting details on gravestones, and there was a lot of other stuff going on that week. Later Thomas must’ve researched the stone, and he told me how to decipher the code! So I left that coded message for him at Chelsea Market. But I don’t think he’s ever looked at it. :-( Maybe someone else will see it and figure it out.

(Note that there is no letter J in the code, because originally I and J were the same letter. Very cool.)